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LRNIN2RUN

Walker
Registered: 03/15/08
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 

I am a fairly new runner (2 years) and am training for my 2nd Music city 1/2 marathon.  When I do my long runs I walk down to cool off then soon after get the cold sweats and shiver for about 2 hours following.  Does anyone know what is going on?

Grady

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10ker, board elite
Registered: 07/20/07
Posts: 1,464
Reply with quote  #2 
I'm not sure what you mean by cold sweats, but your body is getting chilled. Your core temperature is dropping after you stop running. Since you're warm -- or at least not freezing -- when you finish running, you don't notice it immediately. By the time you notice it, you've gotten too cold. Part of the reason you get cold so quickly is that all your clothes, shoes, and socks are wet with sweat.

Also, some of us experience sort of a crash a half hour or so after a hard run. I often get chilled in 60 degree weather.

Assuming you're not already hypothermic as you are running, the best thing to do is to immediately switch into dry clothes when you finish running. That includes dry underwear, socks, a cap, and dry shoes. I normally change shortly after I finish running in my car. Lots of guys (and women) do it, too.  Usually, I just wait long enough to mostly stop sweating and then change.


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Grady

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10ker, board elite
Registered: 07/20/07
Posts: 1,464
Reply with quote  #3 
Oh, if you're new to running, you might still be wearing cotton T-shirts or socks. Stop immediately. Cotton loses almost all it's thermal protection when wet, so it's easy to run for a while, sweat until the cotton is soaked, and then get really cold on the last part of your run. Your core temperature can actually drop while you are running.

You can get high-tech, wicking fabric tops at Wal Mart and Target for $10-$15 so there's no excuse to wear cotton.

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Runningtaters

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Plodder
Registered: 03/01/08
Posts: 59
Reply with quote  #4 
Grady makes an excellent point about wearing synthetic blend clothing. Here's just a few other things to consider about body temperature and running.

1. Are you hydrating properly? Under-hydration and over-hydration are both hard on the body and can interface with its ability to regulate temperature. In fact, over-hydration is arguably the more dangerous of the two because it causes serious electrolyte imbalances.
2. Are you taking any medications?
3. Running makes our bodies generate a lot of heat and the most efficient way to get rid of it is through our skin. So, when you've run an hour or two (or three) you don't immediately stop "fanning off" this heat. I dare say none of the systemic adaptations that running causes stop immediately.
4. Which really comes back to Grady's point. It's really important to dress properly, and get into some warm dry clothes ASAP, especially in the winter. If you've got a couple layers of cotton on it keeps you warm at the beginning of your run, but as you heat up and begin to sweat the moisture just sits on you and chills you.

Keep running. You might want to read up at runnersworld.com or google some of this stuff just to get some evidence based information.

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MarkD

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Runner
Registered: 12/16/07
Posts: 202
Reply with quote  #5 
Maybe you're wearing too much? I try to wear a little less rather than a little more and just rely on running to keep me warm. That way I don't get too sweaty which in the winter is the worst thing to me. I jump into my warmups, a sweatshirt, or whatever is appropriate as soon as I'm done.

I'll also never forget trying to get warm after getting dehydrated. I really let it go once and I'll never make that mistake again. Thought I had the flu for while there before I realized what it was. Very unpleasant experience.

Ran one night in a light rain when it was about forty degrees. Won't do that again either. Went into the shower as soon as I got done and still didn't feel warm until the next day.

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Imarunner

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Jogger
Registered: 12/14/07
Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #6 

If none of the suggestions work for you, you may want to go to a Dr. and see if something is going on.

eddieedmonds

Walker
Registered: 08/08/08
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #7 
@LRNIN2RUN

What's up, I have the same thing happen to me after long runs, I do where the high tech fabrics, and I am always hydrated and I eat very well... here is what I have concluded from my experience.

When you run your core temp rises naturally, and you normally sweat, so when your finished running, the next natural thing for your body to do is to put itself at it's normal resting rate/equilibrium, when you sweat this is your bodies way of releasing heat, naturally you'll feel cool or cold at least in my case.

I look at it like this, when summer first rolls after a long winter what happens? You sweat a little more until your body gets adjusted to the heat... when winter rolls around you tend to cover a bit more till your body gets adjusted to the cold, I've found through my travels throughout the world that this happens most extremely when moving from a southern state/country to a northern state/country or vice versa.

For instance when I moved up north from Texas to Delaware, I was very cold during the winter times but I always saw people walking around way less bundled up than me because their bodies where used to the temperatures. As I lived there longer the same happened to me and I no longer walked around like a giant snowman.

On the flip side, same thing happened when I moved from Delaware to Illinois I was used to the mild climate and then in IL where in the summer time it's gets really freaking humid and hot, I was always looking for the nearest air conditioner vent, but after being exposed for a while to that, it no longer was a problem.

So I've concluded the same for running and the cold sweats you described... basically if you run for a long time your body gets used to the heat... when you stop like I said your body starts releasing the heat but because it's been at a higher core temp for a while even the temperature that you were fine in before you ran feels a little chilly until a few hours later your body readjusts.

So that's my two cents.

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Eddie Edmonds
robert

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Runner
Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 248
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imarunner

If none of the suggestions work for you, you may want to go to a Dr. and see if something is going on.



I agree with Imarunner.

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